It’s Monday, What Are You Reading? (Nov. 15)

Read:

Blameless by Gail Carriger — Very Funny!

Reading:

Touched by an Alien by Gini Koch – I started this one while stuck in the ER today.  I’m only a few pages in, but so far it is really cute.

Acquired:

Start! The Bible for New Believers (NKJV) ed. Greg Laurie — This is a review copy that arrived via the Book Sneeze program.

The Emerald Atlas by John Stephens — this is an ARC provided by Random House. This book apparently got a lot of buzz at the Bologna Children’s Book Fair. I am about 24 pages into it, but I think I’ve going to finish Touched by an Alien first.

Other News:

I have been spending most of my online and reading time participating in an Online Steampunk Writing Class. There are ideas flying all about as well as a good breakdown of the genre. I am having fun.

 

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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading is organized by Sheila over at Book Journey. Be sure to stop by her site and read the great blogs of the other participates.

( On a personal note I’d like to thank St. Jude, St. Rita, the Blessed Mother, and Heavenly Father for all the prayers they’ve answered in the last month and to continue to ask for their help and blessings.)

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It’s Monday, What Are You Reading? (Aug. 30th)

Read:

It’s a Book by Lane Smith. Check out my review here.

I also finished Cowgirl Rising: The Art of Donna Howell-Sickles by Peg Streep. This is an awesome art book. Donna Howell-Sickles images are of striking women full of confidence and a goddess like aura. According to the text she mixes Native American and Western mythos with the symbols of Greek and Roman Goddesses. Some of her cowgirls faces are defined other are sketches, but they never lose their power. The color red is very present in the images, always powerful and joyful – never angry.  I am thinking that Cowgirls would make a good topic for the next women’s book salon. Do y’all know of any good non-fiction on Cowgirls, esp those that might exist outside the American West?

Other News:

I have started-up as an affiliate with BookDepository.com. There is a box in the sidebar and there might be the occasional book links, like the two above. I’d like to also set up an affiliate link up with Barnes & Noble too, but that looks slightly more complicated so it will have to wait.

Reading:

Trouble in Triplicate by Rex Stout — I LOVE Nero Wolfe mysteries and I think I am in love with Timothy Hutton’s Archie Goodwin.  If you aren’t familiar with Nero Wolfe or Archie Goodwin then you should check out the Wolfe Pack website.

Purchased:

Blameless by Gail Carriger — Just picked this up today, but haven’t even read the first page yet.

Blogs You Should See:

Driving Ms. Pamela Tour — in which Pamela Ewen talks about all the places she’s traveled on her newest book tour for The Secret of the Shroud.

Desert Book Chick has done some wonderful post lately.

Notes on Life — not only has great reviews, but did you see this newest picture of Bee on Lavender?

That’s the week!

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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading is organized by Sheila over at Book Journey. Be sure to stop by her site and read the great blogs of the other participates.

( On a personal note I’d like to thank St. Jude, St. Rita, the Blessed Mother, and Heavenly Father for all the prayers they’ve answered in the last month and to continue to ask for their help and blessings.)

What I’m Reading this Week (May 24th)

Read:
Changeless by Gail Carriger (my review is here.)

Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson — I don’t have much to say about this one. I was drawn to it by the cover, and it meandered pleasantly along. Don’t go into it expecting it to “pick-up,” because it isn’t that kind of book really. There are a few action packed pages at the very end. It was story of family and pride and manners and mores. Of old ways versus new times and breaking traditions. Some where in the midst of thinking it is boring, you realize you care about these characters and want to know how it ends.  It is all narrated by the Major who is 68 and has at the opening of the story received news that his brother has died. It is about his tenuous and growing relationship with Mrs. Ali, a widow who runs the local show and is from a different cultural background then the country gentry of the small and stayed English Villagers, and the social pressure they experience from family and friends alike.

Reading:

Silver Borne by Patricia Briggs
– just started. I’ve loved all the other books in the Mercy Thompson series.

(Still reading Alison’s Wonderland edited by Alison Tyler and Climbing Your Family Tree by Ira Wolfman)

The Man Who Loved Books Too Much by Allison Hoover Bartlett ; I’m listening to this on audio. Sometimes I’ve trouble focusing on audio non-fiction at the beginning, but this one is holding my interest from the get go.

Dangerous Liaisons: Fashion and Furniture in the Eighteenth Century (Metropolitan Museum of Art) by Harold Koda, Andrew Bolton, and Mimi Hellman

* Dangerous Liaisons is one of my favorite stories. I’ve read the original book by Choderlos de Laclos, seen half dozen film adaptations, and a theatricality retelling setting the whole thing in Germany before WWII. One of the things I love about the Close and Malkovich movie is the clothes. There is something about the sumptuous clothes and furnishing that help set the mood for the characters despicable sport.  In Dangerous Liaisons: Fashion and Furniture in the Eighteenth Century (of which I’m only in the introduction) is attempting to lay out a coloration between those aspects. The book is basically a museum’s catalog that laid out it art (clothes, furniture, painting, etc) in dioramas that loaned an air of theater to the exhibit while also humanizing the living space. At least that’s what I’ve gleaned so far. I can’t wait to finish this one.

The Secret Lives of Princesses – Illustrated by Rebecca Dautremer and Words by Philippe Lechermeier
* You’ll fall in love with Dautremer’s illustrations the moment you see them. Their bright colors and whimsy drew me in from the start and I knew I had to have the book no matter what the words were. I’m currently several princesses into the book and Lechermerier’s creative mythology has had me laughing out loud in places. While all of us reader would probably identify with Princess Paige, there is a quiz on the website to uncover your true Princess Personality. It turns out that I’m whimsical, who’d have guessed?

That is probably more then I can chew this week, but we will see how it goes.I still have to pick something for the Southern Women book salon on July 11th.

The Secret Lives of PrincessesWish List:

I discovered The Blind Contessa’s New Machine by Carey Wallace over at The Crowed Leaf.

I also discovered Not Quite Paradise: An American Sojourn in Sri Lanka by Adele Barker at Reading Extensively.

Arrived in the Mail:

The Map of True Places by Brunonia Barry — an advance copy, with a lovely cover. I do believe the book is actually out on shelves already.

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading is organized by Sheila over at Book Journey. Be sure to stop by her site and read the great blogs of the other participates.

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Changeless by Gail Carriger

Changeless (The Parasol Protectorate, #2) Changeless by Gail Carriger

I liked Changeless. Like its predecessor, Soulless, this book made me laugh out loud while sitting in occupied rooms forcing me to explain and therefore spread the hilarity to others. I have only to mention the words “squash blossom” to certain people to hear much merriment. I enjoyed the adventure that Ms. Carriger lead us on and the new characters she introduced such as the daring inventor and curmudgeonly lady alpha where among the highlights. I also enjoyed the way the steam punk elements were used to advance the plot instead of being relegated to window dressing. That wonderful parasol! It is enough to make you want one of your own. The only fault I could find with this delightful novel was that the last chapter, setting us up for the sequel, was so infuriating that I was tempted to throw the book clear across the room. If I hadn’t been at work, I might have done just that. September seems like an awfully long way off.

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What I’m Reading This Week (May 17th)

This blog post is part of Shelia at Book Journey’s weekly round-up.

Read:

Not All Princesses Dress in Pink by Jane Yolen and Heidi Stemple — this was a cute picture book I found on the library shelf. I really like how it showed girls doing all manner of activity from sports to construction. The text broke down for me a little as I was reading out loud when I got to the bits about the crown, but that was probably because I was trying not to be too loud in the library. I recommended this for story time at work when it becomes widely available on June 15th.

Well I finished reading A Little Harmless Sex by Melissa Schroeder from last weeks list, but not much else.

Still Reading:

Alison’s Wonderland edited Alison Tyler (ARC) – I am still enjoying this. What I like best is that the fairy tale retellings aren’t retelling of the same stories I’ve heard 1000 times. There maybe some later in the book, but the first few have been new to me at least.

Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson — This is still meandering. I get the idea that it is probably supposed to move at this labored pace. I’ve made up my mind that I will finish, but I lose patience at times.

Changeless by Gail Carriger — almost makes me want to carry a parasol even at night. I hope to finish this one soon.

Added to this week:

Climbing Your Family Tree by Ira Wolfman — I am designing a summer program for 8 to 11 year-olds for the St. Tammany Parish Library on recording your family history. I am hoping this book will give me lots of good ideas.

And in other news the Nebula’s where announced:

I was pleased to see that I’ve already read this year’s winning novel, The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi. The winner of the novella is already in on my TBR pile, The Women of Nell Gwynne’s, Kage Baker, in a lovely edition by Subterranean Press. I must say I didn’t finish the novelette winner “Sinner, Baker, Fabulist, Priest; Red Mask, Black Mask, Gentleman, Beast”, Eugie Foster. I downloaded from EscapePod, but never could get through it.

From the Blogs:

Chew & Digest has a Lawrence Goldstone novel on tap for this week. I’ve read several of Goldstone’s and his wife Nancy’s  non-fiction books about books, but I’ve never tried one of his novels. I’m going to have to add Anatomy of Deception to my wish list.

Reading Extensively points out a Sharon Shinn title that slipped past me called Gateway. It has a divine cover ( I know we shouldn’t judge, but some of the art is just beautiful in it’s own right). I’ll probably have to force myself to catch up on my other Shinn novels before I can justify buying a new one.

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What I’m Reading This Week

A weekly what are you reading recap is going around the web and I thought this would be a good chance to remind myself of what books I’m reading and maybe prioritize?

Seven-Tenths: Love, Piracy, and Science at Sea by David Fisichella
— the back cover copy sold me on this the moment I read it. If it lives up to the hype this will be a great memoir. Published by Leapfrog Press, whose website I also just discovered. I’m only a few pages in, but it’s allure is pulling me away from the other titles on my list.

A Little Harmless Sex by Alison Eastwood Melissa Schroeder (no idea where I picked up the wrong name)– I’ve downloaded this title from Fictionwise.com and have loaded it onto my nook. It is incredibly short and not bad, but I can’t seem to finish it. I believe this is mostly do to with the fact that I feel as though I know where it is going and have therefore completed it in my head. (Does that make sense?)

Changeless by Gail Carriger — this is the book I’m dying to get back to if I can stop getting distracted. Carriger is a very funny author and I thoroughly enjoyed the first title in this series. Changeless is shaping up to be a winner as well.

Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson — I’m listening to this one on audio. This book has the best cover art I’ve seen! I absolutely love the use of the hatstand. Brilliant. I’m only in chapter three and I’m not sure if my problem with the book is the way it is written or the way it is being read, the prose seem a tad purple at the moment.

Alison’s Wonderland by Alison Tyler (advance) — I just discovered NetGalley.com, now have an e-reader before there was no interest. Now, I’m reading my first ever e-ARC and I must say I’m barely out of the introduction and enjoying it immensely.

Reading everyone’s Monday Reading posts have added a few books to my wish list. Tell Me a Story is currently reading a biography that looks great called Ngaio Marsh:Her Life in Crime by Joanne Drayton.

Alita.Reads makes me wonder if I should pick-up Anna Karenina by Tolstoy before Android Karenina arrives in stores. I just don’t know if I have the stamina to add imposing Russian novel to the list of what I’m already reading.

edited to fix author’s name.

Avalon Revisited

Avalon Revisited Avalon Revisited by O. M. Grey

Avalon Revisited is a delightful farce! The whole time I was reading it, I couldn’t help but share bits with whomever was with in earshot. The only fault I could find in this preposterous comedy was that of a zipper, and I’m not even sure you could call it a fault — I just didn’t think they came into common use until after 1920 (though there are whispers of it as far back as 1851). The best I can figure the book is set somewhere around 1852. Doesn’t matter really, I laughed my head off at during that particular scene with chartreuse dress. The whole time I was reading Avalon Revisited I couldn’t help but think of it as some paranormal spoof of a Oscar Wilde-esque play. The Steampunk element was a little light for me — the best use that seemed to serve the plot was a bloodletting device worn by the butler. (Which reminds me of another adorable cliche that I won’t speak about as it will give away part of the ending and this is a must read.) The other novelties mention seemed to be window dressing, but they are nice windows. This is definitely an adult novel as oppose to recent Steampunk fare, like Soulless by Gail Carriger, that would work well with teens.

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