Women During WWII

Women During WWII

Barnes & Noble
Mandeville, LA

Sunday, September 12 @ 4 pm

Join the conversation. The Women’s Book Salon is not like a normal book club. It is a bi-monthly event where everyone can read whatever book appeals to them on the topic of the month. Then for an hour or so on a lazy Sunday afternoon we get together and talk and talk.

For September, our topic is Women of WWII. It is a celebration of the mothers, daughters, sisters, and lovers whose bravery and sacrifice was just as great as any solider on the front.

This will be our fourth meeting. During our first meeting we talking about women from Louisiana, for our second we talked about international women, and the for our third we discussed Southern women. I have read about some interesting women. Margaret Haughery, Margery Kemp, and various Southern Greats in a collection called Hell’s Belles.

I have attached a list of suggested books here: Women during WWII Table. I look forward to reading Slacks and Calluses: One Summer in the Bomber Factory and learning about the many other facets of life of women during that time both in the war and at home.

Women’s Book Salon

Just a reminder that the Women’s Book Salon is this Sunday, July 11th @ 4pm @ the Barnes & Noble in Mandeville, LA.

This month’s subject is Southern Women Wit, Wisdom, and Stereotype.

Southern Women: Wit Wisdom Stereotype

Southern Women:
Wit * Wisdom * Stereotype

Sunday, July 11, 2010 — 4pm

Join the conversation. The Women’s Book Salon at the Mandeville, LA – Barnes & Noble is not like a normal book club. It is a bi-monthly event where everyone can read what ever book appeals to them on the topic of the month. Then for an hour or so on a lazy Sunday afternoon we get together and talk and talk.

For July, our topic is Southern Women, defined however you like. There are lots of books on the topic, or just come and tell us what your mama used to say. The point is for people who love to read and talk about books to have a place to come and talk with a conversation starter.

Here are some titles to get you started:

A Southern Belle Primer: Why Princess Margaret Will Never Be a Kappa Kappa Gamma by Maryln Schwartz

The Southern Belle’s Handbook : Sissy LeBlanc’s Rules to Live By by Loraine Despres

Suck Your Stomach In and Put Some Color On!: What Southern Mamas Tell Their Daughters that the Rest of Y’all Should Know Too by Shellie Rushing Tomlinson

What Southern Women Know (That Every Woman Should): Timeless Secrets to Get Everything you Want in Love, Life, and Work by Ronda Rich

We’re Just Like You, Only Prettier: Confessions of a Tarnished Southern Belle by Celia Rivenbark

Bless Your Heart, Tramp: And Other Southern Endearments by Celia Rivenbark

Suddenly Southern: A Yankee’s Guide to Living in Dixie by Maureen Duffin-Ward and Gary Hallgren

Miss Hildreth Wore Brown: Anecdotes of a Southern Belle by Olivia deBelle Byrd

The Education of the Southern Belle: Higher Education and Student Socialization in the Antebellum South by Christie Farnham

Suck Your Stomach In and Put Some Color On!: What Southern Mamas Tell Their Daughters that the Rest of Y’all Should Know Too by Shellie Rushing Tomlinson

Swag: Southern Women Aging Gracefully by Melinda Rainey Thompson

What Southern Women Know about Faith: Kitchen Table Stories and Back Porch Comfort by Ronda Rich

Bless Your Heart, Tramp: And Other Southern Endearments by Celia Rivenbark

The Southern Woman: Selected Fiction (Modern Library Classics) by Elizabeth Spencer

The Grits (Girls Raised In The South) Guide to Life by Deborah Ford

Sarah Morgan: The Civil War Diary Of A Southern Woman by Sarah Morgan Dawson

Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady by Florence King

Some Day You’ll Thank Me for This: The Official Southern Ladies’ Guide to Being a “Perfect” Mother by Gayden Metcalfe and Charlotte Hays

Ar’n’t I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South by Deborah G. White

Red Clay, Blue Cadillac: Stories of Twelve Southern Women by Michael Malone

Scarlett Doesn’t Live Here Anymore: SOUTHERN WOMEN IN THE CIVIL WAR ERA (Women in American History) by Laura F. Edwards

Being Dead Is No Excuse: The Official Southern Ladies Guide To Hosting the Perfect Funeral by Gayden Metcalfe and Charlotte Hays

Somebody Is Going to Die if Lilly Beth Doesn’t Catch That Bouquet: The Official Southern Ladies’ Guide to Hosting the Perfect Wedding by Gayden Metcalfe and Charlotte Hays

The Southern Lady: From Pedestal to Politics, 1830-1930 by Anne Firor Scott

The Belle Gone Bad: White Southern Women Writers and the Dark Seductress (Southern Literary Studies) by Betina Entzminger

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Linchpin & Salons

I like audio books like Linchpin by Seth Godin, they help charge my personal batteries and press me to do something. I’ve enjoyed several of Godin’s books, but I think Linchpin is my favorite. I don’t know why. Maybe, because they remind me that change is possible from any position or point. Maybe, because them help me reaffirm that my art is something real. That doing what I love is something I should be doing.

When I listened to Godin’s Tribes,I remembered feeling fired up, but not really knowing what to do with that energy. I often feel like paralyzed by choice. That I want to do everything and don’t know where to start. Then I’m reminded to just start! Doing the work. Producing something and getting out the door is the point or at least the start. Godin calls it your art, your real work.

He talks about fighting the distractions and the Lizard Brain. As he gives his examples, I can see them at work in the life around me.

Sunday, I hosted a Women’s Book Salon. One person attended. My friend Toni Orrill, who has a deep faith. We’d both chosen to read about women who led religious lives.  I’d read about Margery Kempe and she’d read about St. Teresa and about a missionary’s wife who’s name is escaping me at the moment (I’ll have to ask again).  As she was telling me about St. Teresa and ‘soul work’ the words she was using to describe this where the same words that Godin had used in Linchpin.

It was so odd to here these echoes in my mind. One about building your inner castle and working on your soul while fighting the distractions or serpents. The other about finding your true work, your art while fighting the distractions of modern life and your Lizard Brain.

We talked about these parallels for a while before delving back into the lives of the women we’d chosen to read about and the back to our own lives. It was a great conversation.

I always want to read everything. I become curious about the stories presented to me everyday. When the stories and ideas come together like this (I can’t help imaging spider webs in my mind) it is like a magic moment that gives me an amazing amount of energy that I can’t wait to channel into new projects.

What charges your batteries? What ideas have come together for you lately?

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Women of the World Book Salon

This is just a reminder that the Women’s Book Salon at the Mandeville, LA Barnes & Noble will be taking place on May 2nd @ 4pm. This salon is open to everyone. There is no set book, just chose something related to the topic and and join the wonderful discussion.

I’ve decided to talk about the Book of Margery Kempe. I’ve been interested in her since I read the Book of the Maidservant by Rebecca Barnhouse. Her story isn’t very long and though I’m enjoying it, it is taking me ages to read. I will have to make an effort in the next few days to finish the book.

I look forward finding out what everyone picked.